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Thread: More VCMs

  1. #1

    More VCMs

    The SN2 movement was developed by Nanjing Watch Factory in the 1960s and was produced for many years after. Itís a low-cost, low-grade movement known for its durability and long power reserve. Nanjing manufactured a 9-jewel version, but three other factories made their own variants, usually upgraded with a higher jewel count. Jieyang Watch Factory in Guangdong was one of these factories. It made 11- and 17-jewel upgrades.

    This Kuihua (sunflower), a product of Jieyang, has an 11-jewel SN2 movement.









    While wearing the Kuihua today, I noticed it ticks very loudly. It might be the loudest movement in my collection.

    (More to come...)
    My collection of Vintage Chinese Mechanicals can be seen at myvcms.com

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  3. #2
    MultiModerator Martin's Avatar
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    Very nice!
    My Shongzhan sn-2 has a huge power reserve for such a simple movement, something like 55 hours. How is it with this one? It could be even more with the additional jewels?

    Regards,

    Martin

  4. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Martin View Post
    Very nice!
    My Shongzhan sn-2 has a huge power reserve for such a simple movement, something like 55 hours. How is it with this one? It could be even more with the additional jewels?

    Regards,

    Martin
    Thanks. Yes, the SN2 has a long power reserve. I had a 9 jewel Huanghe go for more than 60 hours once. I tested it again, and it was 59 and change. I haven't tested the Kuihua yet.

    However, I just wound it. I'll let you know what happens in a couple of days.
    My collection of Vintage Chinese Mechanicals can be seen at myvcms.com

  5. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by saskwatch View Post
    I'll let you know what happens in a couple of days.
    Well, the results are a bit disappointing. It stopped after 19 hours and 28 minutes. I tested again -- 11 hours and 53 minutes. Evidently it needs some attention.
    My collection of Vintage Chinese Mechanicals can be seen at myvcms.com

  6. #5
    MultiModerator Martin's Avatar
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    I guess a drop of oil here and there should help, hopefully a new main spring is not needed...

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  8. #6
    In 1966, Shanghai Watch Factory began production of a new movement, the SS1, designed as an upgrade to the movements used in 581/611 models. AFAIK the earliest mass-produced SS1-powered watches are marked SS1A on the caseback (thereís a beautiful example at the AMCHPR). Soon after, SS1 watches were given four-digit model numbers beginning with 10 or 11.

    The most well known in the series is the 1120, a full-size watch with shock protection and a stainless steel case. Shanghai also manufactured models with chrome-plated cases and/or without shock protection, probably due to shortages of materials at the time.

    SS1A stainless steel case, shock protection
    1010 chrome-plated case, no shock protection
    1020 stainless steel case, no shock protection
    1110 chrome-plated case, shock protection
    1112 chrome-plated case, shock protection, midsize
    1120 stainless steel case, shock protection
    1123 stainless steel case, shock protection (successor to 1120, crown wheel and ratchet wheel are finished differently)
    Old lists mention an 1124, but I havenít seen an example.

    I have a 1010, an 1110, several 1120s, and an 1123. Now I have a 1020 too.



    Beginning with the 10/11 series, every Shanghai brand model had a different caseback design. Some had more than one. The 1020ís was relatively plain.





    The date code on the 18,600 bph SS1 is DE (May 1969).



    In 1972, the 10/11 series was discontinued in favour of the 15 series, featuring the 21,000 bph SS1A-K.
    My collection of Vintage Chinese Mechanicals can be seen at myvcms.com

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  10. #7
    Early examples of tongji watches have always interested me. Itís partly because of their early 1970s style, but also because, by numbers manufactured, the tongji could be the most successful mechanical movement the world has ever seen. The first tongji watch to be mass-produced was Shanghai No. 2 Watch Factoryís SZ1 Baoshihua.



    I already have two SZ1 Baoshihuas, including one with an identical dial. I donít know whether this exampleís second hand is ďcorrectĒ. I wouldnít have bought it if it didnít have this caseback.



    Itís the only exclusively-hanzi SZ1 caseback Iíve ever seen.





    Like the other two I own, the SZ1 movement is marked 2GG above SZ1 under the balance. It has the old-style click present in one of the others. The balance wheel appears to be the normal size for a tongji. All other early SZ1 movements Iíve seen have a smaller balance wheel. It might be a replacement, but I donít know.
    My collection of Vintage Chinese Mechanicals can be seen at myvcms.com

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  12. #8
    Two ST5 watches ó first a Dongfeng:







    Inside is a 18,000 bph ST5.



    Second, a Tianjin with an upside-down logo:





    The more Tianjin brand watches I see, the more Iím convinced they were assembled with whichever parts were at hand. I donít think Iíll ever know whether this one (or any other) left the factory with all of the parts seen today.

    A Dongfeng crown



    A striped 21,600 bph ST5.

    My collection of Vintage Chinese Mechanicals can be seen at myvcms.com

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  14. #9
    MultiModerator Martin's Avatar
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    I love the bracelet on the DongFeng

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  16. #10
    Another textured dial Zuanshi found its way here.



    The text on the back indicates that it was made before the factory changed its name from Shanghai Stopwatch Factory to Shanghai No. 4 Watch Factory in 1978.





    Thereís no date code on the SM1A-K movement, suggesting that itís an earlier version (The earliest SM1A-K date code in my collection is January 1978).



    While this Zuanshi has a nice all steel case, many earlier SM1A watches had half-steel cases (chrome-plated base metal with a stainless steel back). I have the impression that there was a shortage of steel, as it has been documented that such shortages occurred at times. But I wonder why almost all Cultural Revolution era half steel wristwatches were made in Shanghai. We donít see any chrome-plated Dongfengs, Beijings, or Zhongshans.

    I donít have an answer, but occasionally a non-Shanghai half steel watch does appear. For example, this ChangLin:



    ChangLin was the brand name Changzhou Clock & Watch Factory, one of many in Jiangsu province, used for its mechanical watches. Some factory history from this source: It was established in 1971 after some trial production of electronic tuning fork clocks. In the 1970s the factory added mechanical and quartz clocks and watches to its output. Beginning in 1979, digital quartz versions were produced too. It looks like Changzhou Clock & Watch Factory produced mostly electronic clocks and watches throughout its history. From the translation:

    In 1977, Changzhou watch factory moved into the new plant, and gradually recruited more than 400 new employees, in the production of electronic tuning fork clock at the same time, the development, assembly "Chang Ling card" mechanical watches, the development of quartz electronic watches, mechanical wood clock, Electronic clock and so on. Among them, "Chang Ling card" watch from 1975 to 1983, a total assembly of 27,500, in order to lay the foundation for the development of Changzhou watch industry. At that time, party secretary He Binghao inspection Changzhou watch factory, boasted as "Changzhou Pearl"!
    Quartz clocks and watches are still manufactured in Changzhou today, but I donít know if they originate from the same factory.

    Iíve seen pictures of some other ChangLin brand watches. There are all steel and half steel cases. Some have blank casebacks. Others are signed.



    I read at another forum that blank casebacks are seen on earlier models, and signed casebacks came later.



    I donít know whether the Zuanshi crown is original to the watch. Normally Iíd immediately dismiss it as a replacement, but the movement is also a product of Shanghai Stopwatch Factory, an SM1A-K.



    It doesnít have a date code. With one exception, the other ChangLins Iíve seen have either an SM1A-K or a Shanghai Watch Factory tongji.
    My collection of Vintage Chinese Mechanicals can be seen at myvcms.com

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