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Thread: Removing light scratches on a brushed case

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    Member CamB's Avatar
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    Removing light scratches on a brushed case

    Anyone have any advice on what to use? I have a couple of scratches around the lugs of a brushed case. What would you use to smooth them out?
    Regards Cam

    Watches
    Omega Speedmaster 3510.50, Oris 1965 Diver, Tissot Visodate, Helson Blackbeard, Seiko PADI Turtle, Tag Heuer F1

  2. #2
    Scotchbrite pad (of suitable ferocity)

    http://www.ebay.com.au/sch/i.html?_f...brite&_sacat=0

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    Member scottjc's Avatar
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    Super fine diamond paste applied with a cotton bud.
    Sent from my Nokia Lumia 1020 using Tapatalk
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    El bot. geoffbot's Avatar
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    Anti-scratch spray
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  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by scottjc View Post
    Super fine diamond paste applied with a cotton bud.
    Sent from my Nokia Lumia 1020 using Tapatalk
    Do you then have to be careful to follow the grain of the original brushing?

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    Member scottjc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Der Amf View Post
    Do you then have to be careful to follow the grain of the original brushing?

    Yes, but if you only rub very lightly then it shouldn't be a problem.
    To be honest it brings a frightening amount of grime off the surface so you'll probably continue over the whole watch.
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    Member Rusty's Avatar
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    Removing light scratches on a brushed case

    I have used the purple and grey one with good success on bracelets.
    I personally would be careful using it on a case as it is hard to get it right. It's easy to round off corners, it won't look the same as the other lugs, You end up having to do the rest of the case. Oh the horror!
    Depends on the watch too, It works well on my Oris TT1 as you can get straight runs on the lugs and its a big tool of a watch.
    I would not go anywhere near a Rolex case or like.
    Bright sunshine will show up mistakes terribly.
    Just my thoughts though.
    Rusty
    Last edited by Rusty; Feb 16, 2015 at 06:20 PM.

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  11. #8
    Member CamB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottjc View Post
    Super fine diamond paste applied with a cotton bud.
    Sent from my Nokia Lumia 1020 using Tapatalk
    What micron level are we talking here ?
    Regards Cam

    Watches
    Omega Speedmaster 3510.50, Oris 1965 Diver, Tissot Visodate, Helson Blackbeard, Seiko PADI Turtle, Tag Heuer F1

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  13. #9
    The Dude Abides Nokie's Avatar
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    If using diamond paste, I would stick to a high number (Less abrasive first), like 2.5-3.5 microns and work you way down to something more abrasive like 1.00 or .50 if needed, etc.

    If using a scotchbrite pad, again start with a milder to fine finish like a grey or white pad, and work your way down to a purple or green pad if you need more abrasion.

    The golden rule when correcting stainless steel, paint, plastic, exotic metals, etc is always start with the least abrasive compound first and if that does not work, move on the the next most abrasive compound and so forth....

    The biggest mistake most make is trying to use something too aggressive on the first try, when a medium to fine grit would produce the same results.

    Lapping with diamond paste requires a few passes usually to begin with, using even steady pressure and smooth overlapping strokes that ALWAYS go with the grain of the metal.

    My other hobby is car restoration and trim and stainless correction uses the exact same procedures and methods that you can use on correcting 316L stainless on most watches.
    "Either He's Dead, Or My Watch Has Stopped....."
    Groucho Marx

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    Member scottjc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CamB View Post
    What micron level are we talking here ?

    I use 1.0-0.5 micron, 20,000 mesh diamond paste.
    If the supply of ETA movement parts affects you please complete this survey:
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