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Thread: A little watch history

  1. #1
    Member timekeeper's Avatar
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    A little watch history

    If you were in the market for a watch in 1880, would you know where to get one? You would go to a store, right?

    Well, of course you could do that, but if you wanted one that was cheaper and a bit better than most of the store watches, you went to the train station!







    Sound a bit funny?
    Well, for about 500 towns across the northern United States , that's where the best watches were found.








    Why were the best watches found at the train station?









    The railroad company wasn't selling the watches, not at all.


    The telegraph operator was.



    Most of the time the telegraph operator was located in the railroad station because the telegraph lines followed the railroad tracks from town to town.








    It was usually the shortest distance and the right-of-ways had already been secured for the rail line.










    Most of the station agents were also skilled telegraph operators and that was the primary way that they communicated with the railroad.







    They would know when trains left the previous station and when they were due at their next station.









    And it was the telegraph operator who had the watches.




    As a matter of fact, they sold more of them than almost all the stores combined for a period of about 9 years.









    This was all arranged by "Richard," who was a telegraph operator himself.
    He was on duty in the North Redwood, Minnesota train station one day when a load of watches arrived from the East.
    It was a huge crate of pocket watches. No one ever came to claim them.







    So Richard sent a telegram to the manufacturer and asked them what they wanted to do with the watches.
    The manufacturer didn't want to pay the freight back, so they wired Richard to see if he could sell them.
    So Richard did.








    He sent a wire to every agent in the system asking them if they wanted a cheap, but good, pocket watch.
    He sold the entire case in less than two days and at a handsome profit.








    That started it all.







    He ordered more watches from the watch company and encouraged the telegraph operators to set up a display case in the station offering high quality watches for a cheap price to all the travelers.








    It worked!








    It didn't take long for the word to spread and, before long, people other than travelers came to the train station to buy watches.





    Richard became so busy that he had to hire a professional watch maker to help him with the orders.







    That was Alvah.








    And the rest is history as they say.








    The business took off and soon expanded to many other lines of dry goods.

    Richard and Alvah left the train station and moved their company to Chicago -- and it's still there.














    YES, IT'S A LITTLE KNOWN FACT that for a while in the 1880's, the biggest watch retailer in the country was at the train station.

    It all started with a telegraph operator: Richard Sears and his partner Alvah Roebuck!

    Bet You Didn't Know That.
    Now that's History!




    Omega Speedmaster Ed White

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    many Citizen and Seiko from the years.

  2. #2
    Random guy vinylgreek's Avatar
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    History is very cool. Thanks for sharing this.

  3. #3
    Happily unadjusted 😜 popoki nui's Avatar
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    Neat!! Thanks!


    ~Sherry.
    Eterna | Tudor | Seiko | Casio | G-Shock | Orient | Swatch | Mondaine | Zodiac (pre-Fossil) | Rolex | Wenger | Hamilton Pulsar Time Computer | Omega | Timex | Bucherer | Citizen



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  4. #4
    Member timekeeper's Avatar
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    It was a copy and paste, I wouldn't have said " I bet you didn't know that!" lol
    Omega Speedmaster Ed White

    Omega PO Chrono 45
    Rolex DSSD
    Seiko Pogue gold
    Deep Blue diver
    Zodiac oceanaire
    many Citizen and Seiko from the years.

  5. #5
    Happily unadjusted 😜 popoki nui's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by timekeeper View Post
    It was a copy and paste, I wouldn't have said " I bet you didn't know that!" lol

    No worries! It was still an interesting missive!
    Eterna | Tudor | Seiko | Casio | G-Shock | Orient | Swatch | Mondaine | Zodiac (pre-Fossil) | Rolex | Wenger | Hamilton Pulsar Time Computer | Omega | Timex | Bucherer | Citizen



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  6. #6
    That was very interesting
    Apeks | Archimede | Breitling | Bulova | Cabot Watch Company | Casio | Daniel Wellington | Davosa | Glycine | G-Shock | Hamilton | Nomos | Omega | Rolex | Seiko | Slow | Swatch | Timex | Vostok

  7. #7
    I kept expecting to read something profound like "people wanted to be sure they had accurate timepieces so they would not miss their train," but of course the truth is much simpler: extra inventory. Cool story!

  8. #8
    The Dude Abides Nokie's Avatar
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    Great reading and good to know info. Thanks for posting.
    "Either He's Dead, Or My Watch Has Stopped....."
    Groucho Marx

  9. #9
    thanks for sharing!

    nowdays, most people back with pocket watches... its called mobile phones .. and no they dont buy them at the train station (but they could..since you can buy phones 'everywhere' nowdays =)

  10. #10
    And now you know...the REST of the story.

    Rick "good day!" Denney
    More than 500 characters worth of watches.

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