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Thread: Thinking of flipping my Speedmaster for a Speedmaster... am I mad?

  1. #1
    Member workahol's Avatar
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    Thinking of flipping my Speedmaster for a Speedmaster... am I mad?

    (apologies to the owners of the photos in this post, I'm just borrowing them as to use as examples)

    I've owned an Omega Speedmaster Professional 3570.50.00 for a few years. It's an early-2000's model with Luminova dial and non-tapered bracelet with the double-button clasp - so basically, a standard modern Moonwatch. Looks just like this one:



    It's always been a special favorite, one I thought I'd never part with... and yet, lately I've been having certain thoughts. Unfaithful thoughts. Maybe even heretical thoughts. Don't get me wrong, I have no plans to be without a Speedmaster in my collection. But I've never been a big fan of the non-tapered 1998 bracelet. Just don't like the way it causes the whole package to look so unbalanced. So I started looking at the older style tapered ones, and that led me to start dreaming of patinated tritium dials, and before I knew it I was staring longingly at images like these:





    I've nearly managed to convince myself that for the same or less out-of-pocket cost as buying a 1498/1499 tapered bracelet, I could sell my Speedmaster and buy another one like the photos above. An older one, that is. Not so old as to be a priceless antique, but one from a couple decades back that's showing a bit of age but still looks dynamite. Creamy tritium lume plots. Enough patina to keep a grown man awake at night. Mmmm. Err... ahem.

    Still, I already have a Moonwatch. It's a perfectly nice one. I can't believe I am seriously considering flipping it for an older one with a sightly different-shaped bit that goes round the wrist, and hour markers that don't glow as well but are a bit more yellow-colored than what I've already got.

    I must be nuts...

    - Matt
    Last edited by workahol; Apr 2, 2015 at 10:39 AM.

  2. #2
    Moderator - Central tribe125's Avatar
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    No, not nuts, but the tricky bit might be finding the older model in a condition that would satisfy you.

    Looking at the pictures above, it would be very easy to say: 'Number 2, please!', but that is a very clean example. Could you find one as good, with box, papers and a service history?

  3. #3
    Member CamB's Avatar
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    I would take a nice vintage model every time.
    Regards Cam

    Watches
    Omega Speedmaster 3510.50, Oris 1965 Diver, Tissot Visodate, Helson Blackbeard, Seiko PADI Turtle, Tag Heuer F1

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    Member Teeritz's Avatar
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    If you can find an older model with matching patina on the hands and dial, then I say go for it.

    teeritz

    (IWL Member No. 72)
    **************
    My other distractions ---> http://www.teeritz.blogspot.com.au

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  7. #5
    Hall Monitor Samanator's Avatar
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    I would only do this if it yields a Speedy with a 321 movement.
    Cheers,

    Michael

    Tell everyone you saw it on IWL!

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  9. #6
    i can relate to what you are feeling -i much prefer a tapered bracelet they show off the watch so much more and probably also an aged watch if i am being honest -- this is the original 1171 tapered bracelet on my old 1970' watch also with age related patina and wear - if it makes you more content no reason not to Name:  carmoon2.jpg
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  10. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Teeritz View Post
    If you can find an older model with matching patina on the hands and dial, then I say go for it.
    I agree. The second example shows one of the most common "problems" : the dial has some patina, but the hands seem brand new. Old dial and new hands are something I always try to avoid.
    Last edited by CFR; Apr 6, 2015 at 06:13 PM.

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  12. #8
    Member workahol's Avatar
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    Thanks gents, all good points. I forgot to add that I do have an 1171 bracelet which I've tried on this watch, but for my tastes it's a bit too flimsy and rattly. Reminds me of the stock bracelet on a Seiko 5 honestly. Hence the focus on the 1498/1499.

    Also good points about matching patina - however, I wonder if this is somewhat less important on the Speedmaster, whose white-painted hands with very thin lume strips will provide less opportunity to actually notice any such mismatch.

  13. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by workahol View Post

    Also good points about matching patina - however, I wonder if this is somewhat less important on the Speedmaster, whose white-painted hands with very thin lume strips will provide less opportunity to actually notice any such mismatch.
    You'll notice, it. Trust me.

    Last year I got a Speedy MK II and the seller had two pieces available for me to choose. One of them was a perfect match, but the other had new hands. It was too obvious.

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  15. #10
    Member workahol's Avatar
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    By the way, if mismatched patina on hands and markers bothers you, don't start collecting military watches! The MoD watch repairers weren't as concerned with patina as we are.


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