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Thread: bracelet adjustment (esp. 1963 Omega)

  1. #1

    bracelet adjustment (esp. 1963 Omega)

    I apologize for the lack of pictures - but I just dropped the watch off for service.

    My question has to do with adjusting bracelets. #1 is a 1963 Omega Constellation. It has several links which appear easy to remove - but my question has to do with the clasp. It seems to have quite a number of possible position for attaching the last link to the clasp. It looks to me as if there might be as much as 2 links worth of adjustment to be had there.

    Is this correct? Are there any "gotchas"? Is there an "ideal" position for this attachment (that is, given a choice, would you move the attachment point or remove a link.

    The trials and tribulations associated with a puny left wrist...

    Since I have a number of similar bracelets to shorten - who has a recommendation on the correct tool (and technique?)

    The Ebels appear to use screws - same question on tools and technique. I have appropriate screwdrivers. What else do I need?

    Most of my bracelets don't seem to have all that much room for adjusment in the clasp - is the Omega unusual in that regard?
    La lutte elle-mme vers les sommets suffit remplir un cur d'homme; il faut imaginer Sisyphe heureux.

  2. #2
    Appropriate screwdrivers are all you really need for a bracelet fitted with screws, but a bracelet block is also handy.

    But sometimes people use thread-lock substances, making removal difficult. I have a force limit and if that doesn't loosen the screw I'll let the watchmaker be responsible for it.

    The adjustments provided by extra springbar holes in a fold-over clasp usually just add fine adjustment. Make sure one of those sets of holes isn't the locking detent for the clasp.

    Rick "who has, for some watches, had to give up on some screws and work with a different link" Denney
    More than 500 characters worth of watches.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Rdenney View Post
    The adjustments provided by extra springbar holes in a fold-over clasp usually just add fine adjustment. Make sure one of those sets of holes isn't the locking detent for the clasp.
    Compared to (say) the Ebels - the 1963 Omega bracelet has miles and miles of adjustment available (at least, that's the way it looks to me). Easily more than a full link. But, I wonder if
    there's a "preferred" attachment point.

    But, I just sent it out - when it comes back, I'll let the nice jeweler adjust it. I'm trying for "see one, do one, teach one" here.
    Last edited by KennethRSloan; Apr 3, 2015 at 09:21 PM.
    La lutte elle-mme vers les sommets suffit remplir un cur d'homme; il faut imaginer Sisyphe heureux.

  4. #4
    [QUOTE=KennethRSloan;95940]
    Quote Originally Posted by Rdenney View Post
    The adjustments provided by extra springbar holes in a fold-over clasp usually just add fine adjustment. Make sure one of those sets of holes isn't the locking detent for the clasp.
    /QUOTE]

    Compared to (say) the Ebels - the 1963 Omega bracelet has miles and miles of adjustment available (at least, that's the way it looks to me). Easily more than a full link. But, I wonder if
    there's a "preferred" attachment point.

    But, I just sent it out - when it comes back, I'll let the nice jeweler adjust it. I'm trying for "see one, do one, teach one" here.
    I don't think it matters. If the clasp works as intended--that is what is required and nothing more.

    Sometimes bracelets have lots of adjustment room because removing links is difficult. Many vintage and lower-line bracelets are held together with friction-fit pins and require a driver/press (or, in some cases, a puller) to remove them. I'd rather use the adjustment holes than do that.

    This led me to take a tour of my bracelets that use traditional shell-style fold over clasps.

    I have a cheap Seiko Quartz watch with a wide range of holes, and mine is adjusted at the tighter end. That prevented having to remove any links, and I never noticed an issue. My Tissot T-touch uses friction pins and has hole adjustments covering maybe half a link. The bracelet on my Lew and Huey has about a link covered by the holes, and uses friction pins. My Seiko black Monster has three half links of adjustment holes, but I removed a link (friction pins of special type) and use the outside hole. My best shell-style clasp is on my Concord Mariner, and I'm using the inside hole. That bracelet has a link's worth of holes but it also comes with two half links (screw pins). With that one, I can adjust the length and also the position of the clasp on my wrist with great precision (not that I felt the need).

    But the bracelet I own probably closest to the type on your Omega is a JB Champion beads-of-rice bracelet on a 60's Tradition (Sears)--which was Sears's best Swiss-made watch. That bracelet uses friction pins and has three links' of range with adjustment holes. Alas, it's too short even on the outer hole.

    Rick "not seeing a trend" Denney
    More than 500 characters worth of watches.

  5. #5
    Member scottjc's Avatar
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    Many of my old bracelets have similar adjustment in the clasp and I use the pointed end of my springbar tool to push the spring in.
    Sometimes, if they are over adjusted, the clasp can become uncomfortable so you just need to try it to see how much adjustment you need and whether it is too much.
    Probably best to remove a couple of links and use the clasp for fine adjustment.
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  6. #6
    The Dude Abides Nokie's Avatar
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    Probably best to remove a couple of links and use the clasp for fine adjustment.
    Agree. Post pix when you get it back and you should get the correct answer. Good luck.
    "Either He's Dead, Or My Watch Has Stopped....."
    Groucho Marx

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