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Thread: Advice Needed 2500 vs 8500

  1. #11
    Member FSM71's Avatar
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    Thanks Crownpuller,

    You and Geoff have given me exactly the kind of personal perspective I want. It's a big help.

    A common theme among 2500D owners seems to be their accuracy. Given that the original Constellation is named for observatory timing tests, this is appropriate.

    I suspect that in daily wear, the longer power reserve may not be as important as a slimmer profile. Since I got the 7.65mm thick Montblanc Heritage, I have experienced what a difference a slimmer profile can make to comfort.
    I'd Schwarzkopf it daily, except I couldn't be bothered with the inevitable explanations...

  2. #12
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    2500D all the way. While not as technically advanced as the 8500, its a fine movement. Its thin, it can be regulated to fine accuracy, and serviced by nearly everyone.
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    Retired from Fire/Rescue with 30 years on the job 1/05/2019

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  4. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by FSM71 View Post
    While realising that it won't be the most popular choice on this forum, I have my heart set on the modern Constellation rather than the more vintage inspired Globemasters or sportier Seamasters. My choice is between the 38mm with the 8500 caliber and the 35mm with the 2500 caliber.... So what do the Omega fans say? Is the 8500 worth the extra cash? Is it really necessary in a office watch? From what I read, people are very happy with the accuracy of the 2500. Please let me know your ideas, preferences and opinions (personal opinions are fine) of these movements.
    I am a long-time owner (8+ years) of an early year second generation Aqua Terra -- it has an 8500 movement but no Si wheel. So, I don't have experience with the watch you want but I have lived with the 8500 for a while. I also wear it -- for the most part -- in an office environment, usually business casual but often with a suit as well. The alleged "thickness" of the watch has never been a problem for me, and I do also wear other watches that are thinner so it's not just a matter of me being used to it.

    In my experience, the 8500 is rock solid and keeps amazing time (mine has been +/- 1 second per day). It's also a very pretty movement, at least as far as mass-produced movements go. That said, all the reports of the 2500D I have seen are also very positive so, day to day, I really don't think one is better than the other in terms of real world use. The 8500 does have a longer power reserve, but that won't matter very much if this is your primary watch.

    One thing I haven't seen mentioned in this thread -- the 8500 has a "jumping" hour hand. This means you can move the hour hand forwards and backwards in one-hour increments without stopping the movement. It is fantastic for travel. But, it means that the watch does not have a quick set date. You set the date by moving the hour hand forward (or backwards) 24 times. I really love this feature of the movement, perhaps because I travel a fair amount, but I have seen other folks complain about the lack of a quick set date. Just something to consider.

    Quote Originally Posted by FSM71 View Post
    My heart says go for the prettier, more interesting 8500, even if it means saving a bit longer. My head says that the slimmer 2500 is more suited to the Constellation and is perfectly adequate for the task. And it means I can get the watch immediately.
    In my experience, this means you should get the 8500. Otherwise, you will get the 2500 and still lust after the 8500.

    Quote Originally Posted by chuckmiller View Post
    2500D all the way. While not as technically advanced as the 8500, its a fine movement. Its thin, it can be regulated to fine accuracy, and serviced by nearly everyone.
    This is not accurate. The 2500D is still a three-level co-axial movement, and can only be serviced by people qualified on co-axial movements.
    Omega Aqua Terra 8500 | Sinn 856S UTC | Sinn 1746 Klassik | Sinn 6096 Finanzplatzuhren

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  6. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Radharc View Post
    I also wear it -- for the most part -- in an office environment, usually business casual but often with a suit as well. The alleged "thickness" of the watch has never been a problem for me, and I do also wear other watches that are thinner so it's not just a matter of me being used to it.


    One thing I haven't seen mentioned in this thread -- the 8500 has a "jumping" hour hand. This means you can move the hour hand forwards and backwards in one-hour increments without stopping the movement. It is fantastic for travel. But, it means that the watch does not have a quick set date. You set the date by moving the hour hand forward (or backwards) 24 times. I really love this feature of the movement, perhaps because I travel a fair amount, but I have seen other folks complain about the lack of a quick set date. Just something to consider.
    Thanks for the great input.

    You make a good point - I wear my Eterna Soleure with a suit and the 7751 is way thicker than the 8500. It does bother me when it bunches up my cuff, but not enough to make me stop wearing the Soleure to work!

    My Rado R5.5 also has the jumping hour hand, albeit in a quartz movement. You are right - it is great and it's my go-to travel watch (also because it's super light and can't get scratched when chucked into x-ray baskets going through security check points). The R5.5. has a tiny, smooth, ceramic crown though and that does make date setting a pain, especially on the 29th Feb. At least the Constellation has a more substantial, milled crown so it should be a doddle by comparison.
    I'd Schwarzkopf it daily, except I couldn't be bothered with the inevitable explanations...

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  8. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by FSM71 View Post
    Thanks for the great input.
    Hope it was helpful! If I can answer any other questions just let me know.

    And definitely post pics either way. Will be nice to see something other than the usual parade of dive watches and fliegers. (Not there is anything wrong with those...)
    Omega Aqua Terra 8500 | Sinn 856S UTC | Sinn 1746 Klassik | Sinn 6096 Finanzplatzuhren

  9. #16
    Zenith & Vintage Mod Dan R's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Radharc View Post
    I am a long-time owner (8+ years) of an early year second generation Aqua Terra -- it has an 8500 movement but no Si wheel. So, I don't have experience with the watch you want but I have lived with the 8500 for a while. I also wear it -- for the most part -- in an office environment, usually business casual but often with a suit as well. The alleged "thickness" of the watch has never been a problem for me, and I do also wear other watches that are thinner so it's not just a matter of me being used to it.

    In my experience, the 8500 is rock solid and keeps amazing time (mine has been +/- 1 second per day). It's also a very pretty movement, at least as far as mass-produced movements go. That said, all the reports of the 2500D I have seen are also very positive so, day to day, I really don't think one is better than the other in terms of real world use. The 8500 does have a longer power reserve, but that won't matter very much if this is your primary watch.

    One thing I haven't seen mentioned in this thread -- the 8500 has a "jumping" hour hand. This means you can move the hour hand forwards and backwards in one-hour increments without stopping the movement. It is fantastic for travel. But, it means that the watch does not have a quick set date. You set the date by moving the hour hand forward (or backwards) 24 times. I really love this feature of the movement, perhaps because I travel a fair amount, but I have seen other folks complain about the lack of a quick set date. Just something to consider.



    In my experience, this means you should get the 8500. Otherwise, you will get the 2500 and still lust after the 8500.



    This is not accurate. The 2500D is still a three-level co-axial movement, and can only be serviced by people qualified on co-axial movements.
    I have the 8500 with the Si wheel. It is a fine watch and I enjoy it every day I wear it. I have the Planet Ocean 600m in orange and it is one I will not part with.

    Good luck,

    Dan

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  11. #17
    Member Perseus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FSM71 View Post
    Iím asking about the movements. The 2500 and 8500 are used in many of the various Omega watches worn by members of this forum. How about we give the Omega owners with ownership experience a chance to weigh in?
    Ironically Both 2500 Planet Oceans I owned (the first was a very early model, the second was a 2500D) ran +1 /24 which is more accurate than the 8400 in my 300mc. At it's worst the 8400 was gaining 7 seconds and was sent out for warranty work. Here is the 300mc next to it's inspiration:

    Two 300's.jpg

    SM300 03.jpg


  12. #18
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    The 300 Master Coaxial is a GREAT looking piece of simplicity.
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    Retired from Fire/Rescue with 30 years on the job 1/05/2019

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