Likes Likes:  18
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21

Thread: Southend Pier

  1. #1
    Member boatme99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    1,965

    Southend Pier

    That's some pier, that Southend Pier!
    Name:  nintchdbpict000368178625.jpg
Views: 52
Size:  35.8 KB

    You can see the train about 2/3s of the way out.
    I saw a video on it recently. Pretty cool.
    54650

  2. Likes Pip, Strela167, Henry Krinkle liked this post
  3. #2
    Member Pip's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Berkshire, UK
    Posts
    1,361
    The train didnít run for about 15 years when I was a kid so if you wanted to go to the end, you walked. Just over a mile of being battered by the wind and then the same on the way back. Nothing too dramatic, but the train is certainly more pleasant.

    In fact, when I started my apprenticeship in 1984 we had two of the old pier trains in the back yard of the engineering school in Shoeburyness. I wonder if they ever got round to doing anything with them.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  4. Likes boatme99 liked this post
  5. #3
    Member Pip's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Berkshire, UK
    Posts
    1,361
    I should add the reason itís so long: itís not a sea facing pier, itís at the end of the Thames Estuary. So the gradient from land to deep water is very slight. The tide goes out more than half a mile I should think. So to have a pier that back in the day big boats could moor up at, with the lifeboats stationed at the end, it has to be long or the water would be too shallow.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  6. Likes boatme99 liked this post
  7. #4
    Some interesting stuff on https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southend_Pier

    I didn't realise it was the same designer (James Brunlees) that did the Southport one I referred to earlier
    Watches for SALE:
    <PRICE REDUCED> Nivrel 322 Black Dial: http://www.intlwatchleague.com/showt...869#post447869

  8. Likes boatme99, Pip liked this post
  9. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Pip View Post
    I should add the reason itís so long: itís not a sea facing pier, itís at the end of the Thames Estuary. So the gradient from land to deep water is very slight. The tide goes out more than half a mile I should think. So to have a pier that back in the day big boats could moor up at, with the lifeboats stationed at the end, it has to be long or the water would be too shallow.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

    Just to expand on that, I believe that it was, at least partly, to ensure day trippers from London could get here if the tide was out (rather than sail on by to other resorts in Kent)
    G-Shock: GW3000B-1A
    Rolex: Submariner 14060M
    Accurist: 1961 Shockmaster (Gold) & 1965 Shockmaster (Steel)
    Omega: Speedmaster Professional 3570.50.00
    Meistersinger: Perigraph AM1002
    Ben Sherman: S489.OOBS
    Rotary: 1990 Quartz (Gold)
    Steinhart: GMT Ocean One 39mm
    Certina: DS Super PH500M

  10. Likes Pip liked this post
  11. #6
    Moderator - Central tribe125's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Kent - UK
    Posts
    16,417
    Quote Originally Posted by OrangeSport View Post
    Just to expand on that, I believe that it was, at least partly, to ensure day trippers from London could get here if the tide was out (rather than sail on by to other resorts in Kent)

    I believe that’s true. We tend to forget about the old steamer routes.

  12. Likes Pip liked this post
  13. #7
    Yeah, it mentions that in the Wikipedia link:

    In the early 19th century, Southend was growing as a seaside holiday resort. At the time, it was thought that spending time by the sea was good for one's health, and since it was close to the capital, many Londoners would come to Southend for this reason. However the coast at Southend consists of large mudflats, so the sea is never very deep even at full tide – between 13 and 20 feet (4 and 6 m) – and recedes over one mile (1.6 km) from the beach at low tide. Large boats were unable to stop at Southend near to the beach and no boats at all were able to stop at low tide. This meant that many potential visitors would go past Southend and on to Margate, or other resorts where docking facilities were better.
    To counter this trend local dignitaries pushed for a pier to be built. This would allow boats to reach Southend at all tides. The campaign was led by former Lord Mayor of the City of LondonSir William Heygate, 1st Baronet, a resident of Southend.
    Watches for SALE:
    <PRICE REDUCED> Nivrel 322 Black Dial: http://www.intlwatchleague.com/showt...869#post447869

  14. #8
    MWC is that my watch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    came for a look stayed for the biskwits
    Posts
    34,731
    Quote Originally Posted by tribe125 View Post
    I believe that’s true. We tend to forget about the old steamer routes.
    yes holiday in England never really existed before cheap steam / train journeys then those towns that was with in easy reach from major citys became the norm day holidays /weekend etc etc ...remember watching a doc on the invention of steam trains to holidays... from how holidaying on coast was for the rich and famous who could drive to the coast for the day / weekend till the trains open up travel and it became a major holiday locations and of how different cultures tended to certain beaches towns like the kiss me quick of blackpool to the hmm would not know the posh ones I was always in portsmouth or llandudno or borth or Aberystwyth was my playground as a child ..still think it's comical that you had a artillery range and a holiday resort side by side

  15. #9
    Member Pip's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Berkshire, UK
    Posts
    1,361
    Quote Originally Posted by Seriously View Post
    Some interesting stuff on https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southend_Pier

    I didn't realise it was the same designer (James Brunlees) that did the Southport one I referred to earlier
    Good read. I was telling my son about the Montgomery at the weekend but I couldnít remember its name.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro

  16. Likes Seriously liked this post
  17. #10
    All you need to know about my home town can be found here

    https://youtu.be/hg8Q1bx-DO8
    G-Shock: GW3000B-1A
    Rolex: Submariner 14060M
    Accurist: 1961 Shockmaster (Gold) & 1965 Shockmaster (Steel)
    Omega: Speedmaster Professional 3570.50.00
    Meistersinger: Perigraph AM1002
    Ben Sherman: S489.OOBS
    Rotary: 1990 Quartz (Gold)
    Steinhart: GMT Ocean One 39mm
    Certina: DS Super PH500M

  18. Likes Pip liked this post

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
About Us
We are an independent and wide-ranging forum for watch enthusiasts. From mainspring to microchip, from Europe to Asia, from micro-brand to boutique - we cover it all. Novice or expert, we want you to feel at home. Whether it's asking a simple question or contributing to the fund of horological knowledge, it's all the same hobby. Or, if you like, you can just show us a picture of your new watch. We'll provide the welcoming and courteous environment, the rest is up to you!
Join us