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Thread: WR thingy

  1. #21
    Another Member crownpuller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seriously View Post
    I did what now
    You broke it.
    Some people have opinions - The rest of us have taste.

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  3. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by rodia77 View Post
    I'm not the only one! I'm not the only one!

    Attachment 91254
    https://www.jswatch.com/water-resistance-guide

    I still don't see much rationale behind it but at least I have company.
    Quote Originally Posted by crownpuller View Post
    I've always found WR ratings quite baffling.

    For example:
    My neighbour is an enthusiastic scuba diver; he tells me he rarely ventures beyond 40m on a dive, and his deepest dive was 52m....
    So why do 'they' tell me I need at least a rating of 100m WR just to go swimming ?.... or indeed 200m to go scuba diving ?

    My criteria for most of my watches is: Do I need to take it off when I take the kids to the pool ?.... If the answer is yes, I'll change it for one that I can keep on.
    Quote Originally Posted by tribe125 View Post
    If ‘they’ is a watch company, it’s probably due to product liability concerns.

    The ISO standard (ISO 22810:2010) is presumably the most definitive -


    Attachment 91261
    This.
    There are two ISO standards for WR with watches. This one relies on a small sampling of the watches to be pressure tested. These are often not tested in water and once again, those tested only cover a small sampling of that model. So, you pays your money and you takes your chances.

    The other standard is for dive watches. Every single watch made is tested, in still water to a depth that exceeds the rating by 25%. Not all watches that are dive tested say Dive 200, for example, but if a watch has Dive 200 on the dial that very watch did not flood when tested in water at an equivalent pressure of 250 metres depth. Can't remember what the ISO standard is and can't be bothered to look it up, but there you go.
    Solve all your doubts through question mode.

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  5. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Henry Krinkle View Post

    The other standard is for dive watches. Every single watch made is tested, in still water to a depth that exceeds the rating by 25%. Not all watches that are dive tested say Dive 200, for example, but if a watch has Dive 200 on the dial that very watch did not flood when tested in water at an equivalent pressure of 250 metres depth. Can't remember what the ISO standard is and can't be bothered to look it up, but there you go.
    ISO 6425
    Watches for SALE:
    <PRICE REDUCED> Nivrel 322 Black Dial: http://www.intlwatchleague.com/showt...869#post447869

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