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Thread: Which Bicycle?

  1. #1

    Which Bicycle?

    I am looking into buying a bicycle that is durable, reliable and lightweight. I will mostly ride in the city but some roads here are bad so that is why I need something that can take a beating.
    What would you recommend?

  2. #2
    if i was in USA -i would definitely source a vintage Schwinn 1946-Schwinn-B6-2.jpg would be the business for an urban rider !
    this would be my choice of all round bicycle in the uk -Dawes Galaxy tourer - don't come cheap but fabulous British iconic $_57.jpgbicycle - a used one that has been loved and has all you need on it - this one is on ebay at the moment as an example - my own get round is a vintage 80's American made vintage GT Zaskar atb i have kitted out as a tourer with panniers - probably if you are not really into bikes all you might need is a Hybrid which will cover town and country
    Last edited by shameless; Jul 12, 2015 at 01:06 AM.

  3. #3
    Dive Watches & Japanese Moderator OTGabe's Avatar
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    The Trek dual sport bikes are a nice compromise between a road bike and one that can handle rough roads or the occasional greenway or path:

    http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes...ort/ds_series/

    My brother in law has one that's about 5 years old and it's held up very well to suburban commuting and nearly daily use.

  4. #4
    Watch Geek T Bone's Avatar
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    That Schwinn is cool, but NOT the thing for NYC riding! I'd probably have a look at what is popular with your bicycle messengers, they've already figured what is best for the City. Guessing it would be a hybrid of sorts like what Gabe linked above. City/trail. Part mountain bike with enough refinement to make a lot of road riding doable.

    Myself, I'm tempted to get one of the trendy fat tire bikes for suburban riding, but realistically I doubt I'd use it much. When I had mountain bikes, I used them mostly on the road, and not that much after the novelty wore off.
    Regards, T Bone

    Even a broken watch shows correct time once or twice a day. I ought to know, I have a few!

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by T Bone View Post
    That Schwinn is cool, but NOT the thing for NYC riding! I'd probably have a look at what is popular with your bicycle messengers, they've already figured what is best for the City. Guessing it would be a hybrid of sorts like what Gabe linked above. City/trail. Part mountain bike with enough refinement to make a lot of road riding doable.

    Myself, I'm tempted to get one of the trendy fat tire bikes for suburban riding, but realistically I doubt I'd use it much. When I had mountain bikes, I used them mostly on the road, and not that much after the novelty wore off.
    i know you and Gabe are being sensible and correct - but the Schwinn is cool isn't it

  6. Likes T Bone liked this post
  7. #6
    Look at Cyclocross bikes. I just picked up a NOS 2014 Marin Lombard for a nice discount to complement my Trek Domane road bike and my Superfly Mountain bike.. Cyclorcross bikes are designed to provide most of the efficiency and handling of a road bike, but with all weather, all road rideability. The sport itself is pretty insane. But you don't have to pull that kind of stuff to get all the benefits out of the bikes.

    http://www.marinbikes.com/us/bikes/family/lombard

    Don't spend money on an all out race bike. Get something with a little more utility - aluminum is fine. Make sure you can attach fenders and bottles to it. The Lombard is great. But a lot of other companies make some fantastic cyclocross bikes.

  8. #7
    One more thing on why you should grab a cyclocross bike:

    1. Take a beating? Yes.



    2. Rough road capable? For sure.



    3. Lightweight? Definitely.

  9. Likes Chase, mpfrost liked this post
  10. #8
    There's always the Shinola! Presumably the same pluses and minuses that attach to the watches?
    La lutte elle-mme vers les sommets suffit remplir un cur d'homme; il faut imaginer Sisyphe heureux.

  11. #9
    Be careful about choosing what bike messengers ride. Yes, it helps to match the bike to the road - but you also have to match the bike to the rider!

    I agree that a good place to start is a generic, robust bike sold as a "mountain bike" - but firmly in the "consumer" price and quality range. Once you figure
    out that this is *not* what you need, and why, you will know where to go next. But, you can't possibly know that now.
    La lutte elle-mme vers les sommets suffit remplir un cur d'homme; il faut imaginer Sisyphe heureux.

  12. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by thewalrus View Post
    Look at Cyclocross bikes. I just picked up a NOS 2014 Marin Lombard for a nice discount to complement my Trek Domane road bike and my Superfly Mountain bike.. Cyclorcross bikes are designed to provide most of the efficiency and handling of a road bike, but with all weather, all road rideability. The sport itself is pretty insane. But you don't have to pull that kind of stuff to get all the benefits out of the bikes.

    http://www.marinbikes.com/us/bikes/family/lombard

    Don't spend money on an all out race bike. Get something with a little more utility - aluminum is fine. Make sure you can attach fenders and bottles to it. The Lombard is great. But a lot of other companies make some fantastic cyclocross bikes.
    Those cyclocross bikes look cool and definitely what I need but do they make them with straight bar handles?
    Last edited by igo69; Jul 12, 2015 at 07:33 AM.

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