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Thread: Love for the original Captain Cooks?

  1. #1
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    Question Love for the original Captain Cooks?

    Hi,

    Does anybody have a love of the original MKI and MKII 1962-1970s Captain Cooks?

    Name:  1962 Rado Ticin Captain Cook MkI (Italian).jpg
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    Name:  1960s Rado Ticin - Captain Cook (Italy).jpg
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    Name:  1967 Rado Captain Cook MkII (ladies & gents version) (Japan).jpg
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    I'm very interested in learning more about the differences between the models and variations and there's precious little readily available out there on the Interwebs.

    Any information that anyone can share would be much appreciated.

    Slade.

  2. #2
    Member watch carefully's Avatar
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    As you know, my website is lacking hundreds of image links due to the loss of my hosting service.
    And I'm sure you've read this article, but for the benefit of others, I'll post the relevant section here.
    Note: this was published 19 years ago, long before the new CCs were produced.


    Captain Cook



    As mentioned before, Rado is known today for modern design, experimental case materials and elegant, dressy quartz watches. Sporty automatics make up a very small portion of their production, but some intriguing diver’s watches have come from Lengnau, including those named for the 18th Century explorer Captain James Cook. In 1962 Rado began production of a water-resistant watch with black rotating bezel and large, luminous hands. Emblazoned on the dial was the name Captain Cook. At a glance, the design offers little to set the watch apart from divers’ watches of other brands, but a few features make this a remarkable and hard-to-find piece. The fact that it is a divers’ watch made by Rado makes it unusual and, of course, it has the ubiquitous rotating anchor, but other facts make it notable.




    The model [formerly] shown above was made for only a short period. Production began in 1962 and ended in 1968, during which time only about 8,000 pieces were made. Eight thousand watches, made 40 years ago (before mechanical watches became something of an anachronism in the 1970s) and intended to be used underwater helps account for them being in short supply today. The second notable feature of this watch is its automatic movement, which is perhaps the finest offered by Rado at the time. A lovely automatic movement based on the A. Schild calibre 1700/01 powers the Captain Cook Mk I. The movement sports a gold-plated rotor and is adjusted and outfitted with thirty jewels.



    Rado revised the Captain Cook in both men's and ladies'; versions later in the 1960s, changing the shape to a tonneau and using an internal rotating bezel adjustable by a second crown at 4:00. A 25-jewel automatic movement (AS 1859, shown above) powers this iteration. These watches are also difficult to find today but were made in much higher quantities and seem to come on the market more frequently than the earliest model. A newer model has helped carry on the spirit of Captain Cook in the Rado collection. In 1998, Rado issued a DiaStar diver’s model, which utilizes a similar rotating inner bezel, in a limited series of 5000 pieces. The current line-up of Rado's The Original (Diastar) includes a pair of colorful diver models (see www.Rado.com). [Update, Jan 2020: Since 2017, Rado has also introduced modern revisions of both the Mk I and Mk II Captain Cook models, as well as a larger Mk III.]


    CAPTAIN COOK

    Ref. 11683
    Start of production: 1962
    End of production: 1968
    Quantity: ca 8,000 pieces
    Dial versions: black only

    Ref. 770
    Start of production: 1962
    End of production: 1968
    Quantity: ca 3,000 pieces

    Ref. 727
    Start of production: 1966
    End of production: 1972
    Quantity: ca 15,000 pieces

    Ref. 11773 (new Ref. 589.3004.4)
    Start of production: 1965
    End of production: 1972
    Quantity: ca 50,000 pieces

    Ref. 11868 (new Ref. 999.3004.4)
    Start of production: 1967
    End of production: 1972
    Quantity: ca 5,000 pieces

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  4. #3
    Here's my re release of the MkI with my original MK II. The MkI is the first LE of and is the size of the original.

    P1073320 copy copy2 by Hank Blanc, on Flickr

    The MkII has an internal bezel vs the external one of the Mk I. The case is essentialy a Marco Polo case with an extra crown. This case was also used on the extremely rare Sapporro.

    I'll have a look at what's inside. It's a slow set/slow change movement and I am fairly certain it's an A Schild 18somethingortother.

    The MkI has an AS 1700/01 in it.
    I would love a vintage MK I but the prices are ridiculous. When I bought my reissue for the best part of full price from the dealer "nice" examples of the original were going for close to a grand more.
    Solve all your doubts through question mode.

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  6. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by watch carefully View Post
    As you know, my website is lacking hundreds of image links due to the loss of my hosting service.
    And I'm sure you've read this article, but for the benefit of others, I'll post the relevant section here.
    Note: this was published 19 years ago, long before the new CCs were produced.
    Hi Brad,

    Yes thanks I had read your article. It is probably one of the best collections of info about the original CCs, particularly those production run numbers.

    I have some questions about where the MK1 vs MK2 vs MK3 fit?

    Is the MK1 the original 1962 models (the 11683 and 770) and the MK2 the 1965-1972 (the 727, 11773 and 11868), and were they what Rado labelled the CC "Neo" in the advertising of the time?

    Also, where does the model number 11773/2 or 117733 fit? Is the "/2" a bracelet configuration option or a differing revision of a model?




    Your article mentions "A 25-jewel automatic movement (AS 1859)" and the place on your site where I see the AS 1858 mentioned are in the sections on Chronometers where you mention "25-jewel A. Schild caliber 1858 (based on cal. 1903 plates)."

    Did Rado use the AS 1858 in the CCs at some point, or are the AS 1858 - 1859 an evolution of the same movement family?

    Thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by Henry Krinkle View Post
    Here's my re release of the MkI with my original MK II. The MkI is the first LE of and is the size of the original.

    The MkII has an internal bezel vs the external one of the Mk I. The case is essentialy a Marco Polo case with an extra crown. This case was also used on the extremely rare Sapporro.

    I'll have a look at what's inside. It's a slow set/slow change movement and I am fairly certain it's an A Schild 18somethingortother.

    The MkI has an AS 1700/01 in it.
    I would love a vintage MK I but the prices are ridiculous. When I bought my reissue for the best part of full price from the dealer "nice" examples of the original were going for close to a grand more.
    Ahh so the original MK1 had the external Bezel like all these cool "reissues/revitalization" that Rado are currently doing of the CCs, but the MK2 had the rotating inner bezel with the red 20 min time marked.

    I see that the MK1 has the AS 1700/01 and MK2 seems to have either the AS 1858 or AS 1859 (AS 1902/1903) movements then.

    Thanks

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  9. #6
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    Another questions relating to dials. I have seen dials with and without "T25" repeated above the "Swiss Made".

    Is that related to the Tritium exposure for the lume? Is there a date associated with when that was introduced?

    Name:  CC MK2.jpg
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    I kinda like the MK2 with the internal rotating bezel myself...
    Last edited by sladew; Aug 30, 2022 at 11:12 PM.

  10. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Henry Krinkle View Post
    Here's my re release of the MkI with my original MK II. The MkI is the first LE of and is the size of the original.

    P1073320 copy copy2 by Hank Blanc, on Flickr

    The MkII has an internal bezel vs the external one of the Mk I. The case is essentialy a Marco Polo case with an extra crown. This case was also used on the extremely rare Sapporro.

    I'll have a look at what's inside. It's a slow set/slow change movement and I am fairly certain it's an A Schild 18somethingortother.

    The MkI has an AS 1700/01 in it.
    I would love a vintage MK I but the prices are ridiculous. When I bought my reissue for the best part of full price from the dealer "nice" examples of the original were going for close to a grand more.
    What bracelet is your MK2 on there?

    I did read something that said as well as the more popular and rarer grains/beads of rice that the MK2s were found on DiaStar bracelets, and that they had a square ended 18mm width.

  11. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by sladew View Post
    Ahh so the original MK1 had the external Bezel like all these cool "reissues/revitalization" that Rado are currently doing of the CCs, but the MK2 had the rotating inner bezel with the red 20 min time marked.

    I see that the MK1 has the AS 1700/01 and MK2 seems to have either the AS 1858 or AS 1859 (AS 1902/1903) movements then.

    Thanks
    According to Ranfft it should be the AS 1903 for the Mk IIs. These are the automatic versions with the slow change, slow set day mechanisms. According to Ranfft.

    The 11868 is day/date version so it should have the AS 1906 in it.

    Name:  download.jpg
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    Love the markers on this. They seem to be "floating" markers attached to the crystal.

    Regarding ref numbers with a /2 after. They wouldn't be bracelet configurations. They are generally something fairly major, like changing the type of movement in them. It's possible that the the 11733/2 has an early , for Rado, ETA movement in it, though I have no information on that.
    Last edited by Henry Krinkle; Aug 31, 2022 at 03:46 PM.
    Solve all your doubts through question mode.

  12. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by sladew View Post
    What bracelet is your MK2 on there?

    I did read something that said as well as the more popular and rarer grains/beads of rice that the MK2s were found on DiaStar bracelets, and that they had a square ended 18mm width.
    Yes mine has the 7 row NSA with straight ends. My Mk II is actually a pile of junk, like many are, but I got it for around $250 when versions that were only somewhat better were going for a grand. And, I kind of like it junky. I've passed on several reasonably priced examples in better shape since.

    More interesting for me is the bracelet on my MkI reissue. It is an original bracelet for the original MkI. I found a NOS example years ago and was waiting for the right Mk I, but then the reissue came along and it cost less than the original. I took the fairly crappy starp off and traded it for a proper beads of rice, with a slide lock scuba clasp.

    PC180723 by Hank Blanc, on Flickr

    P3270173 by Hank Blanc, on Flickr

    P3270175 by Hank Blanc, on Flickr

    PC210020 by Hank Blanc, on Flickr
    Solve all your doubts through question mode.

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  14. #10
    Moderator scottjc's Avatar
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    My three Captain Cooks, all modern reissues.
    L to R: Mk1 Mk2 37mm LE, Mk2 Mk2, current 42mm reissue.

    Sent from my SM-N986B using Tapatalk
    If the supply of ETA movement parts affects you please complete this survey:
    https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/swiss_watches

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