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Thread: Spring bar tweezers & pliers

  1. #1

    Spring bar tweezers & pliers

    Just wondering if anyone uses these when swapping out straps and bracelets. Are they any good and which one do you recommend? Thanks.


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    Cheers,

    Richard

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  3. #2
    I don’t, but if I was to buy a set I’d go with option 3 because they have a limit stop , and will be more controllable and reduce the risk of slippage and damaging the strap as a result.
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  4. #3
    Member litlmn's Avatar
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    I have the Horotec ones (Second pic), and frankly I hate them. Of course YMMV, but I stick to the old school Bergeon Spring bar tools. Granted I wouldn't mind trying the Bergeon Pliers (option 3 I believe), but too expensive for me.

    So if you want to give them a try let me know. They're just collecting dust anyway.
    Last edited by litlmn; Aug 7, 2019 at 08:40 PM.

  5. #4
    Yeah the Bergeon ones are quite expensive. Not sure if they are really worth it.
    Cheers,

    Richard

  6. #5
    Moderator - Central tribe125's Avatar
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    Watchmakers use the Bergeron ones and seem to remove and replace bracelets in a flash. I’ve considered them, but have been put off by the price.

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  8. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Cybotron View Post
    Yeah the Bergeon ones are quite expensive. Not sure if they are really worth it.
    I have the third style. With patience they work well. I want the Bergeon but can't justify the expense.

    -- Wayne

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  10. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Cybotron View Post
    Yeah the Bergeon ones are quite expensive. Not sure if they are really worth it.
    'course you can get pattern copies of the Bergeon for a lot less

    https://www.aliexpress.com/wholesale...itch_new_app=y
    Watches for SALE:
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  12. #8
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    I have one like pic #3. I think its a Bergeron and I think it was expensive. It really isn't easy to use. On a leather or rubber strap change it's just easier to "dig" at one springbar tip at a time with a standard tool. If I remember, I have a bracelet on something that almost requires the pliers. Due to the tight fit of the end link to the case there is nearly zero room to work out one springbar tip at a time.
    Last edited by chuckmiller; Aug 8, 2019 at 04:23 PM.
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    Retired from Fire/Rescue with 30 years on the job 1/05/2019

  13. #9
    A lot of the time, when I do it at work , which is usual because that’s where my deliveries come to..... anyway when I do I use a nude Stanley blade
    Quite effective really
    Watches for SALE:
    <PRICE REDUCED> Nivrel 322 Black Dial: http://www.intlwatchleague.com/showt...869#post447869

  14. #10
    Afaik Ric , where's he gone, uses the Berg. and pretty sure said brill. Use their normal fine myself , or a screwdriver on a bracelet. Used to use a penknive which worked fine too.
    Got a few cheap springbar tools in the past, not great but some work, most too bulky to fit

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